Once Upon A Time Writing Lesson: Right-Sizing Cast

Once Upon a Time is a case study for plotting out a series. It exhibits why it is important to have a game plan–no matter how rough–in place at the beginning of a creative endeavor. This helps writers avoid retreading past plot points or completely dropping the ball on others. Characters need to go hand in hand with this early plotting–their arcs, their backgrounds, etc.

Meet the ‘Heritage Lost’ Cast: Katya Cassius

Helming The Maelstrom, much of Heritage Lost is told from the perspective of Katya Cassius. A career military officer in the Res Publica De Magistratus, she has found her career stalled at the rank of captain, but at least, she’s finally received her long-dreamed-of space-faring post with her own ship. The Maelstrom may not be glamorous,Continue reading “Meet the ‘Heritage Lost’ Cast: Katya Cassius”

Setting Through The Lens Of Character

The scenery around us often changes in subtle ways depending on our moods and particular outlook on any given day. A garden that once provided comfort might morph into a mockery of that feeling in a darker personal moment, its hedges shifting away from a sense of whimsy, tightening around you, trapping you into aContinue reading “Setting Through The Lens Of Character”

What Writers Can Learn From The KonMari Method

When I’m sleep deprived, I spew out random things, and sometimes, just sometimes, they stick. In this case, a friend, while talking about reaching the end of her series, noted how sad she’d be to let go of those characters and their world. My response (knowing she’d also read The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up) wasContinue reading “What Writers Can Learn From The KonMari Method”

Don’t Leave Your Scene In Check

What makes a good scene? For some writers, the answer to this question comes naturally while others struggle to make a scene come to life. If you fall in the latter category, don’t fret. Scenes have a lot of moving components, and it takes practice, an open mind, and a lot of reworking to makeContinue reading “Don’t Leave Your Scene In Check”

Why Writers Should Care About Infrastructure

Infrastructure makes everyday life — as we know it — possible. Much of it is buried and can go unthought of when it’s working; however, throw in a major storm that overwhelms our wastewater systems, and bam! we’re wading through poop water. The average person really pays no mind to infrastructure — minus during times ofContinue reading “Why Writers Should Care About Infrastructure”

A reflection on character relationships

I believe writers have quirks that appear across the broad body of their works — little nuggets of ourselves that we can’t help but deposit. Whether it is reoccurring themes or just elements of our life experiences, they appear in the black and white of our prose. And as I continue editing my Scifi novel,Continue reading “A reflection on character relationships”

Character Series: Fears and Phobias

Everyone is afraid of something — heck, even Indiana Jones is. And you know what? That only makes us human. We all know what it is like to be afraid, whether it’s snakes, heights, confined spaces, fire, death, rodents, flying, aliens, dogs, drowning, etc. I personally have an almost debilitating fear of heights; I getContinue reading “Character Series: Fears and Phobias”

Characters, touchy subjects and framing

While going through the revision portion of my novel, one of my readers expressed dislike for a statement made by one of my character. The character is a woman who mused aloud, something to the extent, that she could not imagine being a soldier. I personally have nothing against women as soldiers as long as theyContinue reading “Characters, touchy subjects and framing”